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Protect and Serve

Hurricane Preparedness Tip

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Protecting Your Home

August 03, 2010

Hurricanes Hugo and Marilyn taught us that the most important thing you can do to protect your home is to protect the openings where the wind can get in. Many yard items, such as sheds, fences, chairs and tables ended up smashing into someone’s house, causing unnecessary damage. Make it a household project to secure your yard and neighborhood.

  •  Bring in all objects that can blow away, including your mail box, garbage cans, lawn furniture, garden tools, and plants. Anchor objects that cannot be brought inside. Encourage your neighbors to do the same.
  • Install your shutters or cover all your windows and doors. Install braces on your garage doors if they do not meet the new building code.
  • Keep all windows completely closed during the storm. The old idea of leaving a window cracked open on the opposite side of the house has been proven wrong.
  • Remove your antenna(s) or satellite dishes, but be careful not to touch electrical wires. Unplug your television before taking down your antenna.
  • Shut off the propane gas supply at the tank. Disconnect propane gas to individual appliances, as well. Fill any propane tanks prior to the storm’s arrival.
  • Fill your car’s fuel tank as soon as possible to avoid long lines at the station. Gasoline may not be available for days after the hurricane strikes. Pumps do not work when there is no electricity.
  • Park your car in the garage or carport. If you have neither, put the car as close to the side of the house as possible, away from any trees that might fall on it.
  • When the arrival of a storm is imminent, disconnect the downspouts leading to your cistern. Leaving them connected may result in your cistern being filled with salt-laden water, making it undrinkable.

Do not trim trees right before a storm because trash will not be collected and flying debris can be very dangerous in high winds.

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